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Research Notebooks

Research notes recorded by Edgar S. McFadden. Research was conducted on barley verities: Success, Hanna, Gold, Minn 105, Odinbrucker, Gatami, Nepal, Hamchen; winter wheat varieties: Turkey, Red Chaff, Kharkov; Rye varieties; and Oats varieties: Ruakura, White Tartarian, Acme, Pelissur, Black Persian. Also included is correspondence between McFadden and J.A. Clark, Assistant Agronomist in charge of Western Wheat Investigation and the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Plant Industry.

Religion: Share South Dakota

Correspondence, minutes, and other documents related to Share South Dakota, an organization to better conditions among Indian Americans in South Dakota. Ben Reifel served as vice president to this organization.

South Dakota Memorial Art Center

Correspondence, publications, and other documents related to Ben Reifel's dealings with the South Dakota Memorial Art Center, including his American Indian art collection and his service on their board of directors.

Federal Laws Relating to Campaigns

Booklets about laws relating to federal corrupt practices and political activities, as well as a letter to republican nominees like Ben Reifel from the National Republican Congressional Committee in regards to filing reports of campaign receipts and expenditures.

Ben Reifel's Correspondence for 1946-1949

Correspondence between Ben Reifel, members of the Association on American Indian Affairs, and the secretary of Harvard University in regards to his acceptance at the university, and his temporary leave from the Bureau of Indian Affairs.

Ben Reifel's Correspondence for 1950-1951

Correspondence in regards to Ben Reifel and an article he wrote for the Christian Science Monitor while he was at Harvard. Also includes correspondence between Reifel and the Department of the Interior in regards to his studies of relocation for Crow Creek and Lower Brule reservations.

Ben Reifel's Correspondence for 1952-1963

Correspondence congratulating Ben Reifel on the thesis he wrote during his education at Harvard University. Also includes correspondence in regards to his being named the Superintendent of the Fort Berthold Reservation in North Dakota.

Ben Reifel's Correspondence for 1960

Correspondence between Ben Reifel's campaign manager and those in charge of certain events and schools, arranging for Ben to speak. Also includes itineraries of events that Ben attends.

Ben Reifel's Correspondence for 1963

Letters of thanks written to Ben Reifel by other members of Congress in regards to him sending them copies of the Indian Prayers he shared at the Prayer Group. Also includes letters asking Ben Reifel if he would contribute any items to the Historic Costume and Textile Collection at South Dakota State College.

Ben Reifel's Correspondence for 1965

Correspondence in regards to the items Ben Reifel loaned to the Department of Textiles and Clothing at South Dakota State University, as well as memorial cards, and information pertaining to prints and films that were borrowed for certain events.

Ben Reifel's Correspondence for 1966

Correspondence pertaining to Ben Reifel's re-election victory, as well as lists of sessions to attend at the Third Annual Conference on Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages, which Ben Reifel was a speaker.

Ben Reifel's Correspondence for 1967

Birthday cards and letters for Ben Reifel, as well as correspondence pertaining to giving his files and records to South Dakota. Also includes correspondence pertaining to Ben Reifels campaign for the following year.

Ben Reifel's Correspondence for 1968

Correspondence in regards to the buckskin vest Ben Reifel loaned to the Department of Textiles and Clothing at South Dakota State University, as well as speeches and statements from Ben Reifel pertaining to the problems facing Indian people.

Ben Reifel's Correspondence for 1969

Correspondence in regards to Ben Reifel being asked to become part of the faculty at Northern State University, University of South Dakota, and South Dakota State University. Also includes items such as birthday cards and letters and minutes from the Bishop Hare Home Board Meeting.

Ben Reifel's Correspondence for 1971

Correspondence between Ben Reifel and the Rock County Star Herald, as well as a citation for Ben Reifel's Honorary Doctrate Degree in Humanities from South Dakota State University.

Ben Reifel's Correspondence for 1976-1980

Correspondence in regards to The Grand Council of the Eastern Band of Cherokees and their Constitution, as well as letters of congratulations to Ben Reifel for being the recipient of the First Distinguished Award in the Humanities.

Correspondence

Letters and cards of congratulations to Ben Reifel for winning the political race for Congress.

Ben Reifel's Correspondence with Gerald R. Ford

Correspondence between Gerald R. Ford and Ben Reifel pertaining to Gerald expressing his appreciation for Ben's hardwork and his help in passing the President's tax package. Also includes a birthday letter to Ben from Gerald.

Ben Reifel Correspondence With Linda Hasselstrom

Letter from Congressman Ben Reifel to Linda M. Hasselstrom of Sioux City, Iowa in regards to an article written in the July 11, 1965 issue of the Rapid City Journal about the Sun Dance. Included is a clipping of the article and an additional Rapid City Journal article about Crazy Horse.

Moral Re-Armament

Minutes from the meeting of the Department of Racial and Cultural Relations, as well as correspondence in regards to Moral Re-Armament, which Ben Reifel supported.

Religion: Share South Dakota

Correspondence, minutes, and other documents related to Share South Dakota, an organization to better conditions among Indian Americans in South Dakota. Ben Reifel served as vice president to this organization.

Religion: Prayer Breakfast Meetings

Correspondence and other documents related to House Prayer Breakfast group meetings, a forum for notable political, social, and business figures to meet and build relationships. Reifel held the positions of secretary, vice president, and president for the group.

South Dakota Memorial Art Center

Correspondence, publications, and other documents related to Ben Reifel's dealings with the South Dakota Memorial Art Center, including his American Indian art collection and his service on their board of directors.

Ben Reifel Trip to Europe

Itineraries from trips to the different countries Ben Reifel visited in Europe, as well as thank you letters from Ben to everyone who helped them while they were on their trip.

Correspondence

Letter from Karl S. Quisenberry, Association Agronomist, Western Wheat Investigation, to Edgar S. McFadden in regards to Marquis-Emmer wheat. Included is the planting plan for the Marquis-Emmer selection back-crossed on Marquis to be planted in head rows at Mandan, North Dakota and Webster, South Dakota.

Correspondence

H.L. Loucks responds to the R.F. Pettigrew and expresses sorrow for the current condition of Mrs. Pettigrew. Loucks also returns to his manuscript in speaking about how he wishes to take his time to write his statements and that Pettigrew may read and revise at his leisure, as there is no imminent reason that Loucks manuscript must be ready.

Correspondence

Letter from H. L. Loucks to R.F. Pettigrew about a the creation of the Progressive Party in South Dakota. The back of the letter is a copy of an article written by Loucks called 'The Grange and the Farmers' Problems,'; which discusses the European system of farmer cooperation and advocates its adaptation in the United States.

Correspondence

H. L. Loucks writes to R.F. Pettigrew about the elections of 1914. Loucks speculates that he had lost the election for senator from South Dakota and thanks Pettigrew for his assistance. Loucks also makes comments about the national election results.

Correspondence

Letter from H. L. Loucks to R.F. Pettigrew about the elections of 1914. Loucks describes his disappointment in loosing the local election and comments on the South Dakota's Progressive Party. Loucks also comments on the state of national politics and the losses in the Progressive Party.

Correspondence A

Letter from H. L. Loucks to R.F. Pettigrew about the development of the Progressive Party. Loucks believes that the name should be changed due to the bad public image of progressivism. He mentions the anti-Catholic sentiments during the elections of 1914 around the country. He also talks about President Woodrow Wilson's policies and his tendency to support special interest groups. Loucks proposes a strategy for the Progressive Party for the 1916 elections. He also comments that the Republican candidate (Coe I. Crawford) wants to contest the election of Edwin Stockton Johnson (Democratic candidate) as Senator of South Dakota. Loucks states that he would like to see an investigation into the primary and election for the Senate seat.

Correspondence B

H. L. Loucks writes to R.F. Pettigrew about losing the election for United States Senator from South Dakota. Loucks discusses campaign contributions to the national Progressive Party. He also talks about an investment opportunity for a plant to process flax straw.

Correspondence

H. L. Loucks writes to R.F. Pettigrew about his lingering illness and his long recovery. He discusses the 1914 election including his campaign, losing the election, his opponent: E.S. Johnson, and his conclusion to continue as an independent candidate. Loucks also talks about Richard O. Richards continuing in state politics.

Correspondence

H. L. Loucks writes about his desire to be involved in politics at the national level. He mentions Richard O. Richards will continue his work with the primary law amendments and Loucks believes he will be an ally in the elections. He suggests that Pettigrew should contact progressive leaders throughout the United States.

Correspondence

H. L. Loucks writes to R.F. Pettigrew about his hopes for the national Progressive Party. He suggests that Pettigrew, Richard O. Richards and he start a newspaper to advance their political agenda. He mentions that the Saturday News in Watertown, South Dakota is for sale.

Correspondence

H. L. Loucks writes about the troubled state of politics in South Dakota. He mentions that he would be a part of the Republican Party if they would nominate progressive candidates. Loucks discusses the recent movement for farmers to organize. He mentions that Richard O. Richards has decided to remain in the Republican Party. Loucks believes that not all ballots cast for him were counted in the 1914 election.

Correspondence

H. L. Loucks writes about assisting Richard O. Richards in bringing up a suit to repeal Richards' primary law amendment. He also mentions that Richards does not want to start a newspaper. Loucks is still interested in finding a medium to publish his agenda and discusses the reliability of the press in South Dakota.

Correspondence

H. L. Loucks writes to R.F. Pettigrew about the leaflets he is publishing to promote progressive ideals. He thinks he will use the Rural Credit issue to bring attention to financial issues of farmers. Loucks mentions the upcoming 1916 elections and the likelihood of independent candidates.

Correspondence

H. L. Loucks thanks Pettigrew for his support. He mentions taking advantage the "rural credit" issue to advance his agenda. He also talks about furthering his views by giving an address to the Christian Endeavor Society and visiting with farm and labor organizati

Correspondence

H.L. Loucks writes to R.F. Pettigrew about distributing copies of the address he gave to the Christian Endeavor Society. He mentions the inheritance that Amos and Gifford Pinchot received and suggests that Pettigrew contact them for their assistance in the progressive movement. Loucks talks about inserting leaflets into the local papers and the South Dakota Farmer to promote progressive ideals. He discusses the state primaries for the elections for 1916. He suggests that if the progressive movement could remove Roosevelt and Perkins, then they would have a real progressive party. Loucks talks of feeling betrayed by Richard O. Richards and has no confidence in the state's Republican Party. At the end of the letter her announces that the People's Money League of Chicago has accepted his 'rural credit' plan.

Correspondence

H.L. Loucks writes about his misgivings of Richard O. Richards and his views on taxation and temperance. Loucks does not trust Richards and is hesitant to write an article for him that Richards would want published in local newspapers.

Correspondence

H.L. Loucks expresses his doubt about joining Richard O. Richards in an independent political alliance. Loucks talks about not taking part in the state primary elections and that although he will not lead in the creation of an independent party, he will be willing to help the movement. Loucks asks Pettigrew to reread his address to the Christian Endeavor Society. He discusses his view regarding the money question and the preparedness issue.

Correspondence

H.L. Loucks asks R. F. Pettigrew to read a copy of an address he gave at a meeting in St. Paul. Loucks states that he will not take part in the primary elections and that he cannot be part of the Progressive Party with Roosevelt and Perkins leading it. He feels that the Socialist Party's views are too narrow for him to join them. Loucks suggests that there is a good prospect in South Dakota for the rise of an independent party.

Correspondence

H. L. Loucks writes to R. F. Pettigrew about a court case as to which Loucks is the primary counsel. Loucks mentions that he will use the argument going against the idea of 'rural credit.'; Loucks insists on Pettigrew visit Gifford and Amos Pinchot, whom Loucks deems capable of becoming national leaders.

Correspondence

H.L. Loucks writes to R.F. Pettigrew concerning the 'St. Paul Address,' which garners him visibility. Loucks offers to have the address re-written in a more substantial form to gather more support from the people. He also inquires the help of Pettigrew in the capacity of reviewing Loucks present manuscript for a book which is slated to be published.

Correspondence

H.L. Loucks speaks of his manuscript to R.F. Pettigrew, which he is saddened that he must cut down so as to sell the finished manuscript for a set price. Loucks also mentions that he and Pettigrew should begin to plan for a general conference after the national convention. A mention of Richard O. Richards is also made near the end of the letter speaking of the national convention.

Correspondence

H.L. Loucks talks of his manuscript to R.F. Pettigrew, which has become something of a burden for him. Loucks also continues to talk of starting a new party, which will give them both leverage in the political realm. For now, Loucks determines that they ought to remain quiet and simply wait.

Correspondence

H.L. Loucks thanks R.F Pettigrew for the package of leaflets sent to him and sadly cannot use them and he plans to send them back to Pettigrew. Loucks also talks in length of the new party which they are going to start and the system by which it should be adopted.

Correspondence

H.L. Loucks congratulates R.F. Pettigrew on his recent political fight, saying that Pettigrew gathered a substantial victory. Loucks also mentions his manuscript, the leaflet of Pettigrew's, and the potential publisher of both manuscripts. State primaries are coming and Loucks hope to circumvent any voting too far away from their party lines.

Correspondence

H.L. Loucks continues his previous discussion with R.F. Pettigrew concerning his manuscript and the purpose of said manuscript for their party. Loucks does not intend to wait for the potential publisher and instead plans to move ahead. Loucks hopes that Pettigrew will finish his review of the manuscript soon and forward the manuscript to Thomas Watson.

Correspondence

H.L. Loucks writes to R.F. Pettigrew about the status current politics in terms of calling a national convention. Loucks also mentions a Mrs. A. Burgess, the daughter of a Mr. Crane, who is interested in reviewing the manuscript which Loucks continues to write.

Correspondence

Loucks writes to R.F. Pettigrew concerning the cost of having part of the pamphlet printed as well as the pieces of the manuscript in friendly newspapers. Loucks hopes to copyright certain features of the pamphlet and manuscript to provide solid arguments. Mrs. Burgess urges Loucks to arrange a national call, which Loucks wishes to avoid at the present time.

Correspondence

Loucks talks to R.F. Pettigrew about the current state of their group which has not yet 'practical' levels in South Dakota. State Auditor J.E. Handlin is mentioned by Loucks for his earnest in taking a stand and Loucks wishes to stand by him. A Supreme Court plea is mentioned as well as various other people regarding politics and present status of South Dakota.

Correspondence

H.L. Loucks writes to R.F. Pettigrew concerning Pettigrew's upcoming political venture on a platform with Mr. Landis, which Loucks hopes will throw people for a loop. Loucks expresses his apprehension about Mrs. Burgess and her political aptitude.

Correspondence

Loucks speaks to R.F. Pettigrew about the progress of linotyping the manuscript as well as his desire to simply funnel all his time into the current writing process. Loucks also mentions that with his manuscript, he has not been reading much of the magazines but notices that the farmers have and he wishes to perhaps secure a post writing for such a magazine to benefit their organization

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