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Authority record

Abel, Stan

  • Person
  • Oklahoma State University Coach

Adams, Dwight L. 1922-

  • Person
  • 1922-2007

Dwight Lee Adams was born on July 22, 1922 in Boon, Watauga County, North Carolina to Frank C. and Gertrude (Tester) Adams. He graduated from Virginia High School in 1939 and from Infantry School in 1942.

Dwight served his country in World War Two in the ETO. As a young Major he was assigned to Company D of the 329th Infantry Regiment of the 83rd Infantry Division. He served as a Platoon Commander from until October 23, 1944 when he was promoted to Company Commander. He served as D Company's Commanding Officer until May 5, 1945.

Right after the War, he married Nevorah June Wilson on October 1, 1945 in Ft. Benning, Georgia. He continued to fight for American freedom in the Korean War (1950-1953). Then he graduated from Officers Advanced Course 1959, and received a Bachelor’s Degree in Business Administration at the University of Georgia in 1959.
Dwight, his wife and their three sons moved in 1965 from Patch Barracks, Germany to Brookings, South Dakota. He served as the Army R.O.T.C commander at South Dakota State University from 1965 until his retirement in 1973, with the one year absence during the Vietnam War were he was a military commander at a base in Vietnam. Dwight was awarded Professor Emeritus from SDSU, one of the few in the nation’s military to do so. He served in the United States Army for 35 years, retiring in November of 1973. Dwight loved Brookings and South Dakota. He was very active in coordinating the first boys intramural basketball program in Brookings in the mid-sixties. Hunting, fishing, and sports became his favorite past times when not involved with the activities of family. His love for Jesus Christ was reflected both in his way of life and his involvement at Mt. Calvary Lutheran Church as an active member since 1965. After his Army retirement, Colonel Adams was routinely involved in political management efforts.

Colonel (Ret) Dwight L. Adams, age 85, of Brookings died Tuesday, December 18, 2007, at the Brookings Hospital. He is buried at the First Lutheran Cemetery with military gravesite rites by the South Dakota National Guard Funeral Honors Team.

Aesoph, J.

  • Person
  • South Dakota State University

Aldrich, John Merton, 1866-1934

  • Person
  • 1866-1934

J. M. (John Merton) Aldrich was born on January 28, 1866, in Olmstead County, Minnesota, the son of Levi O. and Mary Moore Aldrich. He was educated in the county and high schools of Rochester, Minnesota. In 1885, he entered Dakota Agricultural College at Brookings, South Dakota. He received his B.S. degree in the first formal commencement exercises of Dakota Agricultural College in 1888 and was the first graduate who specialized in zoological sciences. He later received B.S. and M.S. degrees from the University of Kansas and a Ph. D. from Stanford University.

Following graduation from Dakota Agricultural College in 1888, Aldrich was employed as an assistant in entomology at the college between 1889-1890 and an Assistant in Zoology from 1890-1892. During this time, he was also Assistant to the Agricultural Experiment Station Entomologist. From 1893 to 1913, he was Professor of Zoology at the University of Idaho. While at the University of Idaho, Aldrich began work on his Catalog of North American Diptera. In 1906, he took sabbatical leave to receive a Ph. D. from Stanford University, where his Catalog was accepted as his thesis.

In 1913, after his association with the University of Idaho was terminated, he was then appointed as Entomological Assistant in the U.S. Department of Agriculture Bureau of Entomology at West Lafayette, Indiana. Five years later, he was transferred to the Smithsonian Institution National Museum of Natural History in Washington, D.C. In 1919, he became Custodian of the Diptera (two-winged insects) and Associate Curator of the museum in its division of insects. Aldrich was the first Dipterist employed by the Smithsonian Institution who had been previously employed by the USDA.

Aldrich was known for his unusual success in obtaining rare specimens of insect life in various sections of the western hemisphere, including the western United States, Alaska, and Guatemala. Many of the insects he captured were previously unknown to science. Because of his extensive knowledge of North American Diptera fauna, his eminence made the National Museum the center for studies on New World Diptera. In 1923, Aldrich turned over his specimen collection of more than 45,000 insects, with more than 4,000 classifications.
In addition, he donated to the museum a card catalog file of North American literature on these specimens. This collection is among the most important general Diptera collection in the National Museum. In addition to his work at the National Museum, Aldrich wrote extensively on subjects of insect life. He was also President of the Entomological Society of America (1921) and received many honors and awards.

Aldrich died in 1934 but is still honored today by the existence of the Aldrich Entomology Club, which was formed in 1961 at the University of Idaho. This club provides a forum for student, faculty, and other interested persons to share their enthusiasm for insect biology.

Aldrick, Odel

  • Person
  • South Dakota State University

Alexander, Ruth Ann

  • Person
  • 1924-2010

Ruth Ann Alexander February, 13 1924 – February 1, 2010

Born in Lansing, MI on February 13, 1924 to Harry and Anne (Green) Musselman, Ms. Alexander graduated from East Lansing High School and Michigan State University with a BA in English in 1945. She completed her masters in American studies at the University of Minnesota and her PhD in American intellectual history at Michigan State. She married William Alexander in 1955 and had three children.

Ms. Alexander taught English at South Dakota State University for 34 years, becoming full professor and the first woman to head the English Department (1981-1989). She developed the university's first courses focusing on women writers and African American and Native American literature. She chaired the committee that created the Women's Studies major. Ms. Alexander received numerous grants and fellowships, including a Bunting Fellowship at Harvard in 1987. She received SDSU's Outstanding Educator Award" in 1971, 1972, and 1974. Upon retirement in 1989, she was named Professor Emeritus and continued to research South Dakota women writers and women in the Episcopal Church. From 1994 to 2002 she wrote a column about women in the Episcopal Church called All Sorts and Conditions of Women" for South Dakota Church News. In 2003, she published the collected columns in Patches in a History Quilt: Episcopal Women in the Diocese of South Dakota, 1868-2000. She wrote numerous scholarly articles on such South Dakota writers as Elaine Goodale Eastman and Kate Boyles Bingham. She was a touring member of the Great Plains Chautauqua series, portraying Elizabeth Cady Stanton from 1989-91 and acting as series moderator from 1998-2001.

A life-long advocate of equal opportunities for women and girls, Ms. Alexander was the first woman on the Brookings School Board (1970-1975) and worked for equal funding for activities for girls and boys and higher academic standards. In 1972 Governor Kneip appointed her to the first statewide Commission on the Status of Women where she served until 1979. She also served on the Board of Directors for the South Dakota Historical Association from 1988-2000; the Episcopal Church History Association from 1992-1997 and for the Episcopal Women's Church History Project from 1991-1997. She helped found the Brookings Food Pantry and was chair of the Emergency Services Commission from 1983-1999.

Ruth Ann Alexander died of lymphoma on February 1 in Brookings, South Dakota. She was preceded in death by her husband, William Alexander in 1979; her sister, Jane (Musselman) Addams of Houston, Texas in 2008; and her late life sweetheart, Wes Kelley of Brookings in October 2009. She is survived by her three children: Jane Alexander (Mark Johnson) of New Orleans; Andrew Alexander ( Linda Kruckenberg) of Wayne, NE; and Sarah Alexander of Sioux Falls; and by her siblings: George Musselman of Grand Haven, MI; Sarah (Musselman) Phelps of Madison, WI; and Mary (Musselman) Fischer of Hastings, MN .

Allar, L.

  • Person
  • South Dakota State University

Allen, Mike

  • Person
  • South Dakota State University

Alpha Zeta (South Dakota State University)

  • Corporate body

On February 25, 1924, the South Dakota Chapter of Alpha Zeta at South Dakota State College was chartered with 19 Charter members, as telegraphed by Harry Potter, General Secretary of Alpha Zeta. This effort began with a December 24, 1919 letter of inquiry from S.D.S.C. President Willis E. Johnson. During the application process, the applying group of approximately 25 men was called the Hopkins Club; this process included 3 failed attempts before success finally came under S.D.S.C. President C.W. Pugsley, who was a member of Alpha Zeta, as were many other S.D.S.C. faculty.

The national Fraternity of Alpha Zeta, the oldest fraternal society in agriculture, was founded on November 4, 1897 at Ohio State University and now is a global network of diverse agricultural and natural resources professionals recognizing, developing and promoting leaders with common values and integrity. Alpha Zeta’s purpose is “to promote agriculture in its broad concept while encouraging and developing its actual and potential leadership, fellowship, service and a spirit of love and fraternity are involved."

In 2016, the South Dakota Chapter of Alpha Zeta is an honorary fraternity for top students in the College of Agriculture and Biological Sciences at South Dakota State University. It’s involved in many campus activities, including Career Fair, Ag Day, etc. Some of its community activities include mentoring youth, visiting nursing homes, fence-mending and invasive weed eradication at the Girl Scout’s Camp Wildwood, fund-raising for community service projects, such as the Harvest Table, the Food Pantry, etc.

Althoff, A.

  • Person
  • South Dakota State University

Althoff, N.

  • Person
  • South Dakota State University

Altrusa International. District Seven

Dr. Alfred Durham, a member of Kiwanis, founded the Altrusa Institute in Nashville in 1917. Record numbers of women were going to work during World War I. Dr. Durham saw the need for women's civic organizations. While he would organize the clubs and collect a portion of the dues, Dr. Durham envisioned the Altrusa Institute as a chain of national clubs where business and professional women could meet and exchange ideas.

Dr. Durham's idea caught on. He organized clubs in Nashville, Louisville, and Dayton before he moved on to Indianapolis where he met Mamie L. Bass.

Mamie L. Bass had served as the Superintendent of the Women's Division US Employment Services as well as being a partner in her brother's architecture firm and assisting her brother in organizing a Rotary chapter in Indianapolis. While she admired Dr. Durham's Institute, Bass felt that Altrusa could serve a higher purpose. In June 1918, when Altrusa held its first convention in Indianapolis, Mamie L. Bass's vision became reality. The Altrusa Institute became a classified service organization for women.

Now a classified service organization, the Altrusa Institute renamed itself the National Association of Altrusa Clubs and adopted By-Laws that laid the groundwork for today's Altrusan’s. Soon after, Mamie L. Bass created the Principles of Altrusa which defined Altrusa as "a builder of women" and an organization based on merit and accomplishment. The Principles were officially adopted in 1921 along with a major club building effort. By 1922, Altrusa had 20 clubs.

Since the organization required its members to be working professionals, Altrusa decided to make vocational education for women a national policy. Vocational Guidance expanded over the years to include not only scholarships and guidance for young women but older women as well.

Altrusa became international in 1935 when Altrusa organized its first club in Mexico. From that first step over US borders in 1935, Altrusa moved into` Puerto Rico, Chile, Ecuador, Mexico, India, Korea, Russia, Ukraine, Ireland, Great Britain, Bermuda, Canada, and New Zealand. In 1946, Altrusa sent its first representative to the United Nations.

In the sixties, Altrusan’s began to look to America's youth as the future of Altrusa. In 1966, ASTRA was established. ASTRA service clubs target young women ages 13 to 21 and encourage them in their educations, professions and service to society. Expanding on its commitment to youth, Altrusa adopted literacy as ongoing service in 1977, and in 1997, Altrusa Foundation adopted Camp Safe Haven for children with HIV/AIDS.

The eighties and nineties brought many exciting changes to Altrusa. With the end of Communism, the former Soviet Union saw its first Altrusa clubs. With its increasingly global outlook, Altrusa expanded its projects beyond literacy and education. In 1989, Altrusa adopted a resolution to promote environmental concerns.

Today, despite issues of international concern, Altrusa is, first and foremost, a community based, grassroots organization that seeks to solve the problems in our back yards. Busy Altrusan’s raise money for local charities, volunteer at battered women's shelters, help runaway teens, build houses for Habitat for Humanity, and so much more. Inspired by Thoreau, Mamie L. Bass put it best, "it is not enough to be good; Altrusan’s must be good for something."

Altrusa clubs are grouped by districts pertaining to their geographic location. District Seven is composed of Iowa, Minnesota, Nebraska, North Dakota, South Dakota, Michigan, and Wisconsin.

American Association of University Women. Brookings Branch

  • Organization

In 1931, with 37 members, the Brookings Branch of the American Association of University Women (AAUW) came into being under the presidency of Miss Gertrude Young. However, it was not until 1950, after much effort on the part of the members, that the national group granted current and retroactive membership to all women holding degrees from SDSC.

Throughout the years, activities have been many and varied. One of the first programs was the promotion of a kindergarten. The branch operated and supported a private kindergarten in the basement of the city library from 1932 until 1941 when it was incorporated into the public school system. During World War II, the branch was active in projects to aid the war effort. Members helped distribute gas and sugar rationing cards, did Red Cross work and aided in salvaging materials such as paper and tin cans. Over the years, contributions to the National Fellowship Fund have been made regularly with the branch earning the money through many projects including bridge benefits, style shows, benefit movies, and through the selling of maps, engagement pads, books, calendars, and note cards.

Scholarship and fellowship programs have been of vital concern over the years. A small fellowship to a State College girl in the junior class started the local program. In 1962, the program was replaced with one that awarded a scholarship to a senior in high school and one to an incoming senior at South Dakota State College. In 1964, after the death of Miss Gertrude Young, the names of the local scholarships were changed to the Gertrude Young - AAUW Scholarships to honor the memory of the first president of the Brookings branch.

Over the years, study groups were developed and became more and important. In 1954, three groups - child study, money management, and international relations - joined two established groups - music and crafts. In 1963-64, a new structure was imposed on the study approach. The groups since then have centered in four interests areas - community problems, cultural interests, education and world problems. Many action programs have been the result of these study groups and other special concerns of the members. Some of these have been supporting educational television, promoting books and magazines distributed in foreign countries, and a resolution proposing a room for retarded and emotionally handicapped children in local school systems. Study groups have also concerned themselves with problems in urban space, consumer education, innovations and crises in education and values in society, science and the arts. Interest has also centered on the legislative process, particularly in the areas of education and women's rights.

American Indian Student Association (South Dakota State University)

  • Corporate body

This collection focuses on the nature of the Native American Club, which was renamed to the American Indian Student Association, from 1996 to 2014. The club provides an outlet for Indigenous people on campus to share and learn about their own culture, heritage, and values. The club also seeks to provide awareness of Indigenous values and issues to the larger South Dakota State University population and Brookings community. Anyone that is interested in the club can become a member.

The Native American Club also has created and took part in many activities on campus. The Native American Club organizes the Wacipi (powwow) that is held every year. The Native American Club’s work on the Wacipi includes putting flyers up, finding dancers and drummers, volunteering for setup, and managing the powwow budget. The Native American Club also hosts Hand games, a traditional Indigenous game, where they teach players about the Indigenous importance before playing. The club has also participated in club picnics, pizza parties and basketball tournaments.

Amman, C.

  • Person
  • South Dakota State University
  • Position: 177 Weight Class
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