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Hours of the Virgin, Vellum, France

Leaf from the Hours of the Virgin. The page is made of velum and was created in France around 1450. The recto contains 18 lines with the first 7 lines have been rubricated. The letter D in the middle of the page has been historiated red, blue, and gold and connected to marginal flourishes. The verso also has 18 lines with several phrases rubricated. The Hours of the Virgin, part of the Book of Hours that include devotional prayers for different times of the day. Hours of the Virgin, also known as the Little Office of the Blessed Virgin Mary, contained psalms, lessons, hymns, and prayers said at each of the eight canonical hours: Matins, Lauds, Prime, Terce, Sext, None, Vespers, and Compline. The Book of Hours was the bestselling book of the Middle Ages.

Hours of the Virgin, Vellum, Flemmish

Leaf from the Hours of the Virgin. The handwritten page dates to 1440-1450, is Flemish, and made of velum. The recto contains 13 lines of unornamented text. The verso also has 13 lines with one rubricated phrase. The letter O is historiated in red, blue, and gold and connected to marginal flourishes in gold and blue. The Hours of the Virgin, part of the Book of Hours that include devotional prayers for different times of the day. Hours of the Virgin, also known as the Little Office of the Blessed Virgin Mary, contained psalms, lessons, hymns, and prayers said at each of the eight canonical hours: Matins, Lauds, Prime, Terce, Sext, None, Vespers, and Compline. The Book of Hours was the bestselling book of the Middle Ages.

Hours of the Virgin, Vellum, France

Leaf from the Hours of the Virgin. The page is made of velum originated in Northern France between 1450 and 1460. The recto contains 16 lines with rubricated and historiated initials and rectangular ornamentation in red, blue, and gold. The verso has 16 lines with rubricated and historiated initials, flowers, and rectangular ornamentation in red, blue, and gold. The Hours of the Virgin, part of the Book of Hours that which are devotional prayers for different times of the day. Hours of the Virgin, also known as the Little Office of the Blessed Virgin Mary, contained psalms, lessons, hymns, and prayers said at each of the eight canonical hours: Matins, Lauds, Prime, Terce, Sext, None, Vespers, and Compline. The Book of Hours was the bestselling book of the Middle Ages.

Hours of the Virgin, Vellum, woodcut borders, Paris

Leaf from the Book of Hours (Use of Rome) that was printed by Philippe Pigouchet for Simon Vostre in Paris, France, 1496. The leaf is of velum and decorated with metal cuts along the edges. This is an incunabula leaf as it is printed rather than handwritten. The recto contains 27 printed lines with hand painted rubricated and historiated initials and rectangular ornamentation in red, blue, and gold. The metal cuts depict scenes regarding the crucifixion and Jesus visiting Mary afterward. The verso has 27 lines and does not include hand painted ornamentations. The metal cuts depict scenes of Jesus and his apostles. The Book of Hours include psalms, lessons, hymns, and devotional prayers said at each of the eight canonical hours: Matins, Lauds, Prime, Terce, Sext, None, Vespers, and Compline. The Book of Hours was the bestselling book of the Middle Ages.

Compendio telle historie del regno di Napoli

Compendio delle historie del regno di Napoli Compost da messer Pandolgo Collenucio iurisconsulto in Pesaro
Venitia: ]Michele Tramezino], 1543

Italian humanist Pandolfo Collenuccio was a true Renaissance man. He was a literary, scholar, historian, geographer, collector or rare plants and animals, and diplomat. His works include this history of Naples and poems and dialogues in Latin and Italian.

Itinerarivm Benjaminis

Itinerarium Banjaminis
Lvgd. Batavorum [Leiden]: officinal Elziviriana, [1633]

The book is 2 inches in width and 3 ¾ inches in height. It contains 233 pages, plus a 7-page index and is soft-bound in white leather.

The Old and New Testament connected in the history of the Jews and neibouring nations

The Old and New Testament connect in the history of the Jews and neighbouring nations, from the declension of the kingdoms of Israel and Judah to the time of Christ
London: Printed for R. Knaplock and J. Tonson, 1718

Humphrey Prideaux served as a lecturer in Hebrew at Christ Church, Oxford. Prideaux wrote a number of theological works.

Prideaux, Humphrey, 1648-1724

Richard Pococke

A description of the East, and some other countries
London: Printed for the author, by W. Bowyer, 1743-1745

Richard Pococke, an inveterate traveler, made extensive trips to the Middle East, Egypt, and Europe in the 1730s, 40s, and 50s, visiting many relatively unknown regions. He published detailed narrative accounts of his journeys which were highly regarded by contemporaries.

v. 1. Observations on Egypt -- v. 2, pt. 1. Observation on Palaestine or the Holy Land, Syria, Mesopotamia, Cyprus, and Candia -- v. 2, pt. 2. Observations on the islands of the Archipelago, Asia Minor, Thrace, Greece, and some other parts of Europe.

Pococke, Richard, 1704-1765

A new survey of the globe

A new survey of the globe; or, An accurate mensuration of all the empires, kingdoms, countries, states, principal provinces, counties, & islands in the world . . . A collection of all the noted sea-ports in the world . . . also the settlements & factories, belonging to the English, Dutch . . . etc. in the East and West-Indies, Africa and other parts
London: Printed for J. Bowles, engraved by T. Cole, [ca. 1765]

Thomas Templeman was a writing master at St. Edmund’s Bury in Suffolk, England

Views in the Ottomon empire

Views in the Ottoman empire, chiefly in Caramania, a part of Asia Minor hitherto unexplored : with some curious selections from the islands of Rhodes and Cyprus, and the celebrated cities of Corinth, Carthage, and Tripoli: from the original drawings in the possession of Sir R. Ainslie, taken during his embassy to Constantinople
London: R. Bowyer, 1803

Luigi Mayer was a watercolorist and draftsman of Italian origin. Mayer’s sketches have been cited as the most accurate representations of the Middle East prior to the nineteenth century.

Mayer, Luigi

The works of William Hogarth: from the original plates

The works of William Hogarth: from the original plates, restored by James Heath; with the addition of many subjects not before collected; to which are prefixed, A biographical essay on the genius and productions of Hogarth, and explanations of the subjects of the plates by John Nichols
London: Printed for Baldwin and Cradock by G. Woodfall, [1880?]

William Hogarth was a major figure among eighteenth-century engravers and painters. He excelled at portrait painting and displaying a satiric style.

Hogarth, William, 1697-1764

Volume 1: First year at Dakota Agriculture College [Preservation copy]

This collection is composed of three diaries of J.M Aldrich during his tenure as a student at Dakota Agricultural College from 1885-1888. The diaries give an invaluable account on life as a student during the early years of the college. The diaries are separated into three volumes, one for each year Aldrich was a student at the college. Between 1930 and 1932, Aldrich made typewritten transcripts copied from his original diaries and included parenthetical comments for clarification. Each daily entry states the day and date, which are underlined, and relate Aldrich's daily activities. Most of the entries are trivial, recounting the activity of each day, but give an excellent portrayal of the atmosphere of Dakota Territory life in the 1880s. Topics included in the diaries range from accounts of his journeys between his home in Minnesota to Brookings to administrative upsets such as President George Lilley losing his position to Lewis McLouth.

Volume 2: Second year at Dakota Agricultural College [Preservation copy]

This collection is composed of three diaries of J.M Aldrich during his tenure as a student at Dakota Agricultural College from 1885-1888. The diaries give an invaluable account on life as a student during the early years of the college. The diaries are separated into three volumes, one for each year Aldrich was a student at the college. Between 1930 and 1932, Aldrich made typewritten transcripts copied from his original diaries and included parenthetical comments for clarification. Each daily entry states the day and date, which are underlined, and relate Aldrich's daily activities. Most of the entries are trivial, recounting the activity of each day, but give an excellent portrayal of the atmosphere of Dakota Territory life in the 1880s. Topics included in the diaries range from accounts of his journeys between his home in Minnesota to Brookings to administrative upsets such as President George Lilley losing his position to Lewis McLouth.

Volume 3: Third year at Dakota Agricultural College [Preservation copy]

This collection is composed of three diaries of J.M Aldrich during his tenure as a student at Dakota Agricultural College from 1885-1888. The diaries give an invaluable account on life as a student during the early years of the college. The diaries are separated into three volumes, one for each year Aldrich was a student at the college. Between 1930 and 1932, Aldrich made typewritten transcripts copied from his original diaries and included parenthetical comments for clarification. Each daily entry states the day and date, which are underlined, and relate Aldrich's daily activities. Most of the entries are trivial, recounting the activity of each day, but give an excellent portrayal of the atmosphere of Dakota Territory life in the 1880s. Topics included in the diaries range from accounts of his journeys between his home in Minnesota to Brookings to administrative upsets such as President George Lilley losing his position to Lewis McLouth.

J.M. Aldrich Diaries

  • UA 053.014
  • Papers
  • 1885-1888

This collection is composed of three diaries of J.M Aldrich during his tenure as a student at Dakota Agricultural College from 1885-1888. The diaries give an invaluable account on life as a student during the early years of the college.

The diaries are separated into three volumes, one for each year Aldrich was a student at the college. Between 1930 and 1932, Aldrich made typewritten transcripts copied from his original diaries and included parenthetical comments for clarification. Each daily entry states the day and date, which are underlined, and relate Aldrich's daily activities. Most of the entries are trivial, recounting the activity of each day, but give an excellent portrayal of the atmosphere of Dakota Territory life in the 1880's. Topics included in the diaries range from accounts of his journeys between his home in Minnesota to Brookings to administrative upsets such as President George Lilley losing his position to Lewis McLouth.

Aldrich, John Merton, 1866-1934

Notebooks: Grasses for 1888 and 9: Grains for 1988

  • UA 53.4 - B01-F14
  • Folder
  • 1888-1889
  • Part of N.E. Hansen

N.E Hansen's research notebook regarding field experiments for grasses and grains in 1888 and 1889. The field consisted of 66 plots. He studied 92 varieties in total including: 22 grasses, 9 clovers, 20 wheats, 23 oats, 14 barleys, 1 rye. Hansen was assisted by John M. Aldrich, Alvah George Cross, and J.G. Ross.

Hansen, N.E. (Niels Ebbesen), 1866-1950

Notebooks: Grasses, clovers and forage

Research notebook for N.E. Hansen's experiments with grasses, clovers, and forage that were conducted near the Hunter Salzer Farm by Mellet, South Dakota in 1897 with remarks about 1896. The first part of the notebook discusses his experiments on 38 plots, which included numerous varieties of grasses, oats, wheat, alfalfa, clovers, and corn. The notebook also details his research on an additional 64 plots of grasses and forage plants. The notes include his assessments of the varieties and comments regarding the weather.

Hansen, N.E. (Niels Ebbesen), 1866-1950

Plant specimen: Prunus persica. Dbl. fl. Peach. Kaises VII.

Prunus persica. Dbl. fl. Peach. Kaises VII. Plant specimen collected by N.E. Hansen, 1924. The peach (Prunus persica) is a deciduous tree native to the region of Northwest China between the Tarim Basin and the north slopes of the Kunlun Shan mountains, where it was first domesticated and cultivated. N.E. Hansen (1866-1950) was a Danish-American horticulturist and botanist who was a pioneer in plant breeding. Hansen came to South Dakota in 1895 and became the first head of the Horticultural Department of South Dakota State College. He also served as agricultural explorer for the United States Department of Agriculture. He searched for hardy grasses, fruits, and other plants throughout Europe and Asia and brought them back to the United States to raise or crossbreed with American varieties to produce hardy plants. Specimen is mounted on an 11.5 x 16.5 inch herbarium sheet accompanied by a label with hand-written notation in pencil ink.

Notebooks: Alfalfa and clovers plat: Book 1

Field research notebook of N.E. Hansen. Alfalfa and clover plats planted July 20, 1907. Varieties studied originated from Norway, Turkistan, Russia, Siberia, Sweden, Lapland, and South America. Handwritten

Hansen, N.E. (Niels Ebbesen), 1866-1950

Notebooks: Alfalfa and clovers plat: Book 2

Field research notebook of N. E. Hansen. Alfalfa and clover grasses planted May 1908. Varieties studied originated from Norway, Turkistan, Russia, Siberia, Sweden, Lapland, and South America. Several varieties came from the Moscow Agricultural College (Moscow Timiryazev Agricultural Academy).

Hansen, N.E. (Niels Ebbesen), 1866-1950

Notebooks: Alfalfa's: 1911-M-1-tc

Research notebook for N.E. Hansen's experiments with alfalfa for 1911, with notes regarding 1909 and 1910 experiments. Varieties studied include Omsk, Cossack, Samara, North Sweden, Obb Siberia, and Cherno.

Hansen, N.E. (Niels Ebbesen), 1866-1950

Plant specimen: Pinus pungens, also called Table Mountain Pine, hickory pine, prickly pine or mountain pine.

Pinus pungens, also called Table Mountain Pine, hickory pine, prickly pine or mountain pine. This small pine is native to the Appalachian Mountains in the United States. Plant specimen collected by C.S. Sargent, 1912, first director of the Arnold Arboretum, Herbarium of Iowa College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts, Ames, Iowa. N.E. Hansen graduated from Iowa State College with a bachelor's degree in horticulture in 1887. It is likely Hansen obtained this specimen during his time at the college. N.E. Hansen (1866-1950) was a Danish-American horticulturist and botanist who was a pioneer in plant breeding. Hansen came to South Dakota in 1895 and became the first head of the Horticultural Department of South Dakota State College. He also served as agricultural explorer for the United States Department of Agriculture. He searched for hardy grasses, fruits, and other plants throughout Europe and Asia and brought them back to the United States to raise or crossbreed with American varieties to produce hardy plants. Specimen is mounted on an 11.5 x 16.5 inch herbarium sheet accompanied by a label with hand-written notation in pencil ink.

N.E. Hansen among the Kirghiz Tartars in Semipalatinsk, Siberia in 1913

  • UA53-04-0124
  • Photograph
  • 1913-05-29 to 1913-11-08
  • Part of N.E. Hansen

N.E. Hansen (wearing black collared overcoat and a hat) is standing by two horses drawing an unknown type of machinery, possible a planter of some king, there are three men, one driving and two sitting on the planter, the photograph was taken while N.E. Hansen was among the Kirghiz Tartars in Semipalatinsk, Siberia

Courtyard in Semipalatinsk, Russia in 1913

  • UA53-04-0125
  • Photograph
  • 1913-05-29 to 1913-11-08
  • Part of N.E. Hansen

People in a courtyard by a large ornate tower made of brick with a crumbling archway, Russian words written in Cyrillic script is on the building, taken during N.E. Hansen's trip to Semipalatinsk, Russia

Notebooks: Alfalfa book

Research notebook for N.E. Hansen's experiments with alfalfa, which were conducted throughout South Dakota in 1913. Places include Faith, Ipswich, Isabel, Kadoka, Lemmon, Miller, Mobridge, Pierre, Vivian, and Winner. Varieties studied include Samara, Cossack, Cherno, and Semipalatinsk.

Hansen, N.E. (Niels Ebbesen), 1866-1950

Correspondence

Letter from H. L. Loucks to R.F. Pettigrew about the elections of 1914. Loucks describes his disappointment in loosing the local election and comments on the South Dakota's Progressive Party. Loucks also comments on the state of national politics and the losses in the Progressive Party.

Correspondence B

H. L. Loucks writes to R.F. Pettigrew about losing the election for United States Senator from South Dakota. Loucks discusses campaign contributions to the national Progressive Party. He also talks about an investment opportunity for a plant to process flax straw.

Correspondence

R.F. Pettigrew writes to H.L. Loucks concerning the current state of the nation and state politically. Pettigrew discusses his dislike for President Wilson and the current administration. Pettigrew also mentions the money expenditure used to pay for tax pamphlets and being printed in newspapers. Finally, Pettigrew begins partnership with Loucks for the coming months.

Correspondence

H. L. Loucks writes to R.F. Pettigrew about the elections of 1914. Loucks speculates that he had lost the election for senator from South Dakota and thanks Pettigrew for his assistance. Loucks also makes comments about the national election results.

Correspondence A

Letter from H. L. Loucks to R.F. Pettigrew about the development of the Progressive Party. Loucks believes that the name should be changed due to the bad public image of progressivism. He mentions the anti-Catholic sentiments during the elections of 1914 around the country. He also talks about President Woodrow Wilson's policies and his tendency to support special interest groups. Loucks proposes a strategy for the Progressive Party for the 1916 elections. He also comments that the Republican candidate (Coe I. Crawford) wants to contest the election of Edwin Stockton Johnson (Democratic candidate) as Senator of South Dakota. Loucks states that he would like to see an investigation into the primary and election for the Senate seat.

Correspondence

H. L. Loucks writes to R.F. Pettigrew about his lingering illness and his long recovery. He discusses the 1914 election including his campaign, losing the election, his opponent: E.S. Johnson, and his conclusion to continue as an independent candidate. Loucks also talks about Richard O. Richards continuing in state politics.

Correspondence

H. L. Loucks thanks Pettigrew for his support. He mentions taking advantage the "rural credit" issue to advance his agenda. He also talks about furthering his views by giving an address to the Christian Endeavor Society and visiting with farm and labor organizati

Correspondence

H.L. Loucks writes to R.F. Pettigrew about distributing copies of the address he gave to the Christian Endeavor Society. He mentions the inheritance that Amos and Gifford Pinchot received and suggests that Pettigrew contact them for their assistance in the progressive movement. Loucks talks about inserting leaflets into the local papers and the South Dakota Farmer to promote progressive ideals. He discusses the state primaries for the elections for 1916. He suggests that if the progressive movement could remove Roosevelt and Perkins, then they would have a real progressive party. Loucks talks of feeling betrayed by Richard O. Richards and has no confidence in the state's Republican Party. At the end of the letter her announces that the People's Money League of Chicago has accepted his 'rural credit' plan.

Correspondence

H.L. Loucks writes about his misgivings of Richard O. Richards and his views on taxation and temperance. Loucks does not trust Richards and is hesitant to write an article for him that Richards would want published in local newspapers.

Correspondence

R.F. Pettigrew writes to H.L. Loucks regarding to the Pettigrew's lack of funds to invest into the newspapers currently. Pettigrew also mentions that he is traveling to Washington State to visit his boys and will be unable to respond to Loucks completely.

Correspondence

R.F. Pettigrew discusses with H.L. Loucks his disagreement with Richard O. Richards and his most recent proposition of an income tax. Pettigrew mentions that he would join Richard O. Richards if he organized an independent movement that was not reliant on any of the current political parties. Pettigrew expresses his aspiration to build up either a progressive or people's party that supported the workers.

Correspondence

R.F. Pettigrew writes to H.L. Loucks concerning Pettigrew's desire to take leadership on a present matter as to which he has none. Pettigrew also mentions that his finances keep him from supporting Loucks in the manner in which he would prefer.

Correspondence

R.F. Pettigrew discusses with H.L. Loucks the desire to get at least one newspaper in Sioux Falls for their needs as well having a stock of Pearson's Magazines featuring Charles Edward Russell's article on Grain Trust ready to be distributed. Pettigrew argues the necessity of changing the current society from 'egotistic to altruistic.'

Correspondence

R.F. Pettigrew writes to H.L. Loucks concerning the Richards Law and current referendum in the State legislature. Pettigrew believes that Richards must go alone while still arguing for Primary Law. Pettigrew also mentions the continued desire to buy a newspaper though expresses his inability to do so with current funds.

Correspondence

R.F. Pettigrew responds to H.L. Loucks affirmation regarding Loucks money question. Pettigrew laments of his inability to financially help Loucks in his education endeavors and hopes that his financial condition will soon recover. Pettigrew also speaks boldly of his dislike for money and how it influences the people of Sioux Falls.

Correspondence

H. L. Loucks writes to R.F. Pettigrew about his hopes for the national Progressive Party. He suggests that Pettigrew, Richard O. Richards and he start a newspaper to advance their political agenda. He mentions that the Saturday News in Watertown, South Dakota is for sale.

Correspondence

H. L. Loucks writes about the troubled state of politics in South Dakota. He mentions that he would be a part of the Republican Party if they would nominate progressive candidates. Loucks discusses the recent movement for farmers to organize. He mentions that Richard O. Richards has decided to remain in the Republican Party. Loucks believes that not all ballots cast for him were counted in the 1914 election.

Correspondence

H. L. Loucks writes about assisting Richard O. Richards in bringing up a suit to repeal Richards' primary law amendment. He also mentions that Richards does not want to start a newspaper. Loucks is still interested in finding a medium to publish his agenda and discusses the reliability of the press in South Dakota.

Correspondence

H. L. Loucks writes to R.F. Pettigrew about the leaflets he is publishing to promote progressive ideals. He thinks he will use the Rural Credit issue to bring attention to financial issues of farmers. Loucks mentions the upcoming 1916 elections and the likelihood of independent candidates.

Correspondence

H.L. Loucks expresses his doubt about joining Richard O. Richards in an independent political alliance. Loucks talks about not taking part in the state primary elections and that although he will not lead in the creation of an independent party, he will be willing to help the movement. Loucks asks Pettigrew to reread his address to the Christian Endeavor Society. He discusses his view regarding the money question and the preparedness issue.

Correspondence

R.F. Pettigrew talks with H.L. Loucks concerning the upcoming nomination for presidential candidate for the Republicans, as Pettigrew is hoping for a Progressive candidate as opposed to a reactionary one. Pettigrew also expresses his desire and agreement with Loucks concerning the procurement of numerous newspapers. Pettigrew also mentions various senators and party members, including Charles Edward Russell.

Correspondence

H. L. Loucks writes about his desire to be involved in politics at the national level. He mentions Richard O. Richards will continue his work with the primary law amendments and Loucks believes he will be an ally in the elections. He suggests that Pettigrew should contact progressive leaders throughout the United States.

Correspondence

H.L. Loucks asks R. F. Pettigrew to read a copy of an address he gave at a meeting in St. Paul. Loucks states that he will not take part in the primary elections and that he cannot be part of the Progressive Party with Roosevelt and Perkins leading it. He feels that the Socialist Party's views are too narrow for him to join them. Loucks suggests that there is a good prospect in South Dakota for the rise of an independent party.

Correspondence

R.F. Pettigrew discusses with H.L. Loucks the plan for rural credits which has not yet arrived. Pettigrew strongly states his opposition to class legislation as well as the explanation for such opposition. Pettigrew briefly states his eagerness to write a letter for Pearson's Magazine on the topic of class legislation.

Correspondence

H.L. Loucks writes to R.F. Pettigrew concerning the 'St. Paul Address,' which garners him visibility. Loucks offers to have the address re-written in a more substantial form to gather more support from the people. He also inquires the help of Pettigrew in the capacity of reviewing Loucks present manuscript for a book which is slated to be published.

Correspondence

H.L. Loucks writes to R.F. Pettigrew concerning Pettigrew's upcoming political venture on a platform with Mr. Landis, which Loucks hopes will throw people for a loop. Loucks expresses his apprehension about Mrs. Burgess and her political aptitude.

Correspondence

Loucks speaks to R.F. Pettigrew about the progress of linotyping the manuscript as well as his desire to simply funnel all his time into the current writing process. Loucks also mentions that with his manuscript, he has not been reading much of the magazines but notices that the farmers have and he wishes to perhaps secure a post writing for such a magazine to benefit their organization

Correspondence

R.F. Pettigrew speaks with H.L. Loucks about the Loucks' current article and the arguments therein. Pettigrew mentions that Loucks should follow a particular strain of his own argument that would greatly benefit his article. Pettigrew also voices his dislike for the bankers and financiers of New York. Pettigrew briefly covers his thoughts in regards to 'intrinsic' and 'extrinsic value.'

Correspondence

R.F. Pettigrew writes H.L. Loucks stating his intent to read Loucks' manuscript. Pettigrew also states to Loucks that Pearson's Magazine would be a beneficial place to submit his articles. Pettigrew mentions that now would be an opportune time to begin working towards a constitutional convention in South Dakota with hopes of amending the current constitution.

Correspondence

R.F. Pettigrew writes H.L. Loucks concerning Loucks' manuscripts and articles, pointing out the pros and cons of both. Pettigrew mentions his decision to vote for the Socialists as well as the idea of building up a Socialist party. Pettigrew also states that he does not wish to help Loucks start a new party but will always be available to discuss questions of further importance.

Correspondence

H.L. Loucks thanks R.F Pettigrew for the package of leaflets sent to him and sadly cannot use them and he plans to send them back to Pettigrew. Loucks also talks in length of the new party which they are going to start and the system by which it should be adopted.

Correspondence

H.L. Loucks writes to R.F. Pettigrew about the status current politics in terms of calling a national convention. Loucks also mentions a Mrs. A. Burgess, the daughter of a Mr. Crane, who is interested in reviewing the manuscript which Loucks continues to write.

Correspondence

Loucks continues to speak to R.F. Pettigrew regarding the necessity of calling a state conference with emphasis placed on finding new representatives. Loucks comments on the support and help of Alli Reed in terms of the manuscript and the framework of their organization. Loucks also mentions that his book in moving along, albeit, at a slower pace than he would prefer.

Correspondence

R.F. Pettigrew congratulates H.L. Loucks on his call to action in reference to a conference, one in which Pettigrew is most happy to attend. Pettigrew continues in speaking boldly of his dislike for the party system and their operations of disrepute.

Correspondence

R.F. Pettigrew articulates to H.L. Loucks his distaste for the book that Loucks recommended to him. Pettigrew also mentions that he would prefer to remain distanced from any conference with the author of the book. Pettigrew expresses great admiration and interest in Loucks' manuscript and desire to read it further.

Research Notebooks

Research notes recorded by Edgar S. McFadden. Research was conducted on barley verities: Success, Hanna, Gold, Minn 105, Odinbrucker, Gatami, Nepal, Hamchen; winter wheat varieties: Turkey, Red Chaff, Kharkov; Rye varieties; and Oats varieties: Ruakura, White Tartarian, Acme, Pelissur, Black Persian. Also included is correspondence between McFadden and J.A. Clark, Assistant Agronomist in charge of Western Wheat Investigation and the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Plant Industry.

Correspondence

H. L. Loucks writes to R. F. Pettigrew about a court case as to which Loucks is the primary counsel. Loucks mentions that he will use the argument going against the idea of 'rural credit.'; Loucks insists on Pettigrew visit Gifford and Amos Pinchot, whom Loucks deems capable of becoming national leaders.

Correspondence

H.L. Loucks responds to the R.F. Pettigrew and expresses sorrow for the current condition of Mrs. Pettigrew. Loucks also returns to his manuscript in speaking about how he wishes to take his time to write his statements and that Pettigrew may read and revise at his leisure, as there is no imminent reason that Loucks manuscript must be ready.

Correspondence

H.L. Loucks talks of his manuscript to R.F. Pettigrew, which has become something of a burden for him. Loucks also continues to talk of starting a new party, which will give them both leverage in the political realm. For now, Loucks determines that they ought to remain quiet and simply wait.

Correspondence

Loucks writes to R.F. Pettigrew concerning the cost of having part of the pamphlet printed as well as the pieces of the manuscript in friendly newspapers. Loucks hopes to copyright certain features of the pamphlet and manuscript to provide solid arguments. Mrs. Burgess urges Loucks to arrange a national call, which Loucks wishes to avoid at the present time.

Correspondence

Loucks talks to R.F. Pettigrew about the current state of their group which has not yet 'practical' levels in South Dakota. State Auditor J.E. Handlin is mentioned by Loucks for his earnest in taking a stand and Loucks wishes to stand by him. A Supreme Court plea is mentioned as well as various other people regarding politics and present status of South Dakota.

Correspondence

Loucks articulates to R.F. Pettigrew that an urgent call went out for a conference in Sioux Falls for their organization through the encouragement of Alli Reed. The call for a conference is not only to take place in Sioux Falls but also Chicago. Loucks also mentions that he believes the time is right for action for the Farmers Nonpartisan Political League.

Correspondence

R.F. Pettigrew writes to H.L. Loucks concerning Loucks' address which shall be put into pamphlet form. Pettigrew mentions his great dislike for financiers of New York and the hope that Loucks' address will wake the people up from the spell of the financiers. Pettigrew also comments on the optimism that the people of the country will vote in a republican President.

Correspondence

R.F. Pettigrew expresses to H.L. Loucks the corruption and fraud of the current presidential administration. Pettigrew mentions his sadness and anger over those who would do nothing to change what has always been. Pettigrew reassures Loucks that his work will bear reward someday.

Correspondence

H.L. Loucks speaks of his manuscript to R.F. Pettigrew, which he is saddened that he must cut down so as to sell the finished manuscript for a set price. Loucks also mentions that he and Pettigrew should begin to plan for a general conference after the national convention. A mention of Richard O. Richards is also made near the end of the letter speaking of the national convention.

Correspondence

H.L. Loucks congratulates R.F. Pettigrew on his recent political fight, saying that Pettigrew gathered a substantial victory. Loucks also mentions his manuscript, the leaflet of Pettigrew's, and the potential publisher of both manuscripts. State primaries are coming and Loucks hope to circumvent any voting too far away from their party lines.

Correspondence

H.L. Loucks continues his previous discussion with R.F. Pettigrew concerning his manuscript and the purpose of said manuscript for their party. Loucks does not intend to wait for the potential publisher and instead plans to move ahead. Loucks hopes that Pettigrew will finish his review of the manuscript soon and forward the manuscript to Thomas Watson.

Correspondence

Loucks mentions to R.F. Pettigrew that Hampton is eager for Loucks to prepare an outline of his plan for 'rural credits.' Loucks briefs Pettigrew on the happenings of the Sioux Falls Conference in which his outline has been successful. Loucks also speaks of the new leadership within their organization and who will be helping to lead their organization.

Research Notebooks

Research notes recorded by Edgar S. McFadden on cereal breeding for the prairie northwest. Research was conducted on barley varieties: Success, Nepal, Minn 105, Oderbrucker, Gatami, Hanna, Gold, and Hancher; corn varieties: Oea Hirta, Hopi Maiz, Alta, and Ree Flour; winter wheat varieties: Hope, Lutercens, and Buffum. Also included are notes on garden vegetables: spinach, lettuce, onion, dill, beets, carrots, parsnips, beans, cucumber, muskmelon, and watermelon.

Chicago, Milwaukee, and St. Paul Railway Company Collection

  • MA 033
  • Collection
  • 1913-1918

This collection originated from the Madison, S.D. Railway Depot and was then donated to Prairie Village of Madison. The barn in which Prairie Village kept the records burned down but the records were salvaged. The collection provides a variety of different communications and report information, and is an excellent source to view original documentation. However, the collection is not a complete record of all communications and so is not an effective source for researching specific transactions, etc. It is organized into folders each containing a different form of communication used by the railroad company. The beginning of the collection contains all photocopied material. The middle of the collection contains the encapsulated material, and the end of the collection contains the samples of original records.

Because this collection was damaged in a fire all records received were photocopied with only a few original samples retained from each category of the collection. Some unique samples were encapsulated for easier handling and display.

Chicago, Milwaukee, and St. Paul Railway Company

Plant specimen: Aceraceae Neck. Acer Mairunduense ? et Mey. Plant specimen from the maple family

Aceraceae Neck. Acer Mairunduense ? et Mey.. Plant specimen from the maple family collected by N.E. Hansen, 1924. N.E. Hansen (1866-1950) was a Danish-American horticulturist and botanist who was a pioneer in plant breeding. Hansen came to South Dakota in 1895 and became the first head of the Horticultural Department of South Dakota State College. He also served as agricultural explorer for the United States Department of Agriculture. He searched for hardy grasses, fruits, and other plants throughout Europe and Asia and brought them back to the United States to raise or crossbreed with American varieties to produce hardy plants. Specimen is mounted on an 11.5 x 16.5 inch herbarium sheet accompanied by a label printed in Russian in Cyrillic letter with hand-written notation in black ink.

Plant specimen: Rosaceae B. Juss. Spirea media Schmidt

Rosaceae B. Juss. Spirea media Schmidt. Plant specimen collected by N.E. Hansen, 1924. N.E. Hansen (1866-1950) was a Danish-American horticulturist and botanist who was a pioneer in plant breeding. Hansen came to South Dakota in 1895 and became the first head of the Horticultural Department of South Dakota State College. He also served as agricultural explorer for the United States Department of Agriculture. He searched for hardy grasses, fruits, and other plants throughout Europe and Asia and brought them back to the United States to raise or crossbreed with American varieties to produce hardy plants. Specimen is mounted on an 11.5 x 16.5 inch herbarium sheet accompanied by a label printed in Russian in Cyrillic letter with hand-written notation in blank ink.

Plant specimen: Rosaceae B. Juss. Pyrus ussuriensis Max =P. Sinensis Lindl.

Rosaceae B. Juss. Pyrus ussuriensis Max +P. Sinensis Lindl. Plant specimen collected by N.E. Hansen, 1924, also known as the Ussurian pear, Harbin pear, and Manchurian pear, is a species of flowering plant in the family Rosaceae. It is native to Korea, Japan, and the Ussuri River area of far eastern Russia. N.E. Hansen (1866-1950) was a Danish-American horticulturist and botanist who was a pioneer in plant breeding. Hansen came to South Dakota in 1895 and became the first head of the Horticultural Department of South Dakota State College. He also served as agricultural explorer for the United States Department of Agriculture. He searched for hardy grasses, fruits, and other plants throughout Europe and Asia and brought them back to the United States to raise or crossbreed with American varieties to produce hardy plants. Specimen is mounted on an 11.5 x 16.5 inch herbarium sheet accompanied by a label printed in Russian in Cyrillic letter with hand-written notation in blank ink.

Garden in Harbin, China in 1924

  • UA53-04-0008
  • Photograph
  • 1924-07-26 to 1924-10-17
  • Part of N.E. Hansen

Ornamental plantings in a garden in Harbin, China; written in pencil on the back: Garden at Harbin 1924

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