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Authority record

Berg, D.

  • Person
  • South Dakota State University

Berg, R.

  • Person
  • South Dakota State University

Berg, Sherwood O. (Sherwood Olman) 1919-2014

  • 1919-2014

Sherwood O. Berg was raised on a farm near Hendrum, Minnesota. All of his public schooling was taken at Hendrum where he participated in 4-H Club work for at least 10 years, earning honors in this area. His father died while he was a senior in high school and for a time, Berg took over the management of the home farm.

He attended the School of Agriculture on the St. Paul Campus of the University of Minnesota for two years. He entered South Dakota State College [SDSC] the fall of 1940. He choose to come to SDSC because of their agricultural program, the opportunity to place on the basketball team and to work so that he might contribute to paying his college expenses. In 1943, he entered military service where he remained until 1946. While Berg was in military service, he obtained U.S. Army, field infantry experience. During his last year of military service, he was Military Government Food and Agricultural Officer.

In 1946, Berg returned to South Dakota State. In 1947, he was granted the BS degree. In 1948, he was awarded an MS degree from Cornell University, Ithaca, New York. In 1951, the University of Minnesota conferred the PhD degree on him. Following the completion of his work for the PhD, he was agricultural attache to Yugoslavia from 1951 to 1954 and to Norway and Denmark from 1954 to 1957.

In July 1957, Berg accepted the position of Professor and Head, Department of Agricultural Economics, University of Minnesota. He held this position until June 1963. In July 1963, he accepted the position of Dean of the Institute of Agriculture, and Professor of Economics, University of Minnesota. During his tenure as Dean of the Institute of Agriculture, he served as chair of the President's National Advisory Commission on Food and Fiber.

From 1973 to 1975, Berg was Director, The Indonesia Project of Midwest Universities Consortium. After his work in Indonesia he returned to the United States and to his Alma Mater, beginning his duties as President of South Dakota State University August 1, 1975. He became the first graduate of South Dakota State to be named president. He came to SDSU after serving as the director of the Indonesia Project of the Midwest University Consortium for International Affairs. During Berg’s tenure, South Dakota State saw the internationalization of the campus. Collaborative programs were established in Syria, Botswana, Senegal, and Mauritania, and the number of international students on campus grew. In addition, he oversaw the groundwork for the first endowed chair for the university, the Ethel Austin Martin-Edward Moss Martin Chair in Human Nutrition. Berg retired from the presidency in 1984 and became president emeritus.

In 1952, Sherwood O. Berg married Elizabeth Ann Hall. They have two children, Mary Elizabeth and Bradley Joseph.

Bestack, (?)

  • Person
  • South Dakota State University

Bianchi, Willibald C.

  • Person

Willibald Charles Bianchi was born March 12, 1915 in New Ulm, Minnesota. He was a First Lieutenant in the U.S. Army 45th Infantry, Philippine Scouts. He was among the troops captured by the Japanese and was part of the Bataan Death March Bianchi died on January 9, 1945. He was on an unmarked Japanese prison ship with an American plane, unaware the ship carried American prisoners, dropped a bomb in the cargo hold. Bianchi received the Medal of Honor for actions in Bataan, Philippines during that country's capitulation to Japanese forces during World War II.

Biggar, George C. (George Cecil) 1899-1989

  • Person
  • 1899-1989

George Biggar, son of James Harvey and Caroline Goodfellow Bigger was born on a farm near Aurora, South Dakota on January 11, 1899. He attended South Dakota State University (then South Dakota Agricultural College), where he received a BS in agriculture in 1921 and a MS in Dairy Husbandry in 1922. While at South Dakota State University, he was editor of the Industrial Collegian newspaper and worked on the Jackrabbit yearbook. After graduating, he immediately pursued a career in journalism, working as a reporter for the Moline (Illinois) Dispatch and later the Illinois State Farm Bureau.

In 1924, he began his radio career at station WLS in Chicago, just 3 weeks after Sears-Roebuck started broadcasting. He worked at many radio stations around the country while he was employed by Sears-Roebuck, working mainly with agricultural and farm programs. In 1929, after Sears stopped its broadcasting activities, Biggar returned to WLS. He continued to work on farm, homemaker and entertainer programs, included the National Barn Dance, a show where many country and old performers got their start. During this time, he was also responsible for sending Herb Morrison to cover the Hindenburg landing, where he was the only reporter to witness the tragedy.

In 1938, Biggar moved to WLW in Cincinnati, Ohio, where he was in charge of rural programs, as well as some entertainment programs. At WLW, Biggar was invited to go to Great Britain as a guest of the British Information Service. While there, Biggar observed agricultural practices and noted their changes during the war years. This trip is reflected in many of his papers.

Biggar's career in radio continued until his retirement in 1964. Following his departure from WLW, he continued to move around the Midwest working in radio. He eventually bought station WLBK in DeKalb, Illinois, which is where he finished out his career. Following his retirement, he moved to Laguna Beach, California, and then onto Fargo, North Dakota. He passed away March 19, 1989.

Billow, Joye Ann

  • Person

Joye Ann Billow was born July 28, 1943 in Middletown, Pennsylvania to Mary Dorothea (Pierce) and Schuyler Elsworth Billow. In 1961 she graduated from Middletown High School. She received a Bachelor of Science in pharmacy in 1967, and a PhD in medicinal chemistry from Temple University in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Billow joined the SDSU College of Pharmacy faculty in 1972 and served for 30 years until her retirement in 2002. She was a professor of pharmaceutical sciences and a licensed pharmacist throughout her career.

Dr. Billow was faculty advisor to the Chi Chapter of the Kappa Epsilon Fraternity for women pharmacy students for 29 years. She won the Kappa Epsilon Outstanding Advisor Award (1991), The Unicorn Award (1991), and the Career Achievement Award (2003) during her tenure. She also guided the fraternity to become Outstanding Collegian KE Chapter for 2002-2003.

The SDSU Woman of Distinction award was presented to Billow in 2002 for her excellence in service as a pharmacy faculty member and her involvement in and contributions to numerous campus and community organizations, including coordinator of the Bush Project, chair and vice-chair of the Academic Senate , writing the 1990 self-study for university accreditation, and helping establish the Brookings Women’s Center, Brookings Domestic Abuse Shelter, and Brookings Hospice.

Following retirement, Billow became an art student and produced work that was featured in local shows. She was also a board member of the Brookings Arts Council. She died on December 6, 2013 at the age of 70.

Birnbaum, E.

  • Person
  • South Dakota State University

Bishop, Ben

  • Person
  • Lehigh wrestler 1930's

Bjerke, Marlin

  • Person
  • South Dakota State University

Bjorklund, Elvin 1908-1990

  • 1908-1990

Elvin C. Bjorklund lived from 1908 to 1990 and worked for Soil Conservation Service as deputy state conservationist. He dealt with soil and water conservation needs inventory, flood prevention, and watershed protection. This Collection contains Elvin Bjorklund Soil Conservation Service papers. It is comprised of records on Soil Conservation Service’s works, events, and personnel. Likewise, it has photographs of personnel, conservation, and events.

Blatnick, Jeff

  • Person
  • South Dakota State University
  • Position: 220 lbs Greco

Bly, Dan

  • Person
  • South Dakota State University
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