Progressivism (United States politics)

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Progressivism (United States politics)

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Progressivism (United States politics)

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Correspondence

Letter from H. L. Loucks to R.F. Pettigrew about the elections of 1914. Loucks describes his disappointment in loosing the local election and comments on the South Dakota's Progressive Party. Loucks also comments on the state of national politics and the losses in the Progressive Party.

Correspondence

H. L. Loucks writes to R.F. Pettigrew about his lingering illness and his long recovery. He discusses the 1914 election including his campaign, losing the election, his opponent: E.S. Johnson, and his conclusion to continue as an independent candidate. Loucks also talks about Richard O. Richards continuing in state politics.

Correspondence

H. L. Loucks thanks Pettigrew for his support. He mentions taking advantage the "rural credit" issue to advance his agenda. He also talks about furthering his views by giving an address to the Christian Endeavor Society and visiting with farm and labor organizati

Correspondence

H.L. Loucks writes to R.F. Pettigrew about distributing copies of the address he gave to the Christian Endeavor Society. He mentions the inheritance that Amos and Gifford Pinchot received and suggests that Pettigrew contact them for their assistance in the progressive movement. Loucks talks about inserting leaflets into the local papers and the South Dakota Farmer to promote progressive ideals. He discusses the state primaries for the elections for 1916. He suggests that if the progressive movement could remove Roosevelt and Perkins, then they would have a real progressive party. Loucks talks of feeling betrayed by Richard O. Richards and has no confidence in the state's Republican Party. At the end of the letter her announces that the People's Money League of Chicago has accepted his 'rural credit' plan.

Correspondence

H.L. Loucks writes about his misgivings of Richard O. Richards and his views on taxation and temperance. Loucks does not trust Richards and is hesitant to write an article for him that Richards would want published in local newspapers.

Correspondence

H.L. Loucks writes to R.F. Pettigrew concerning the 'St. Paul Address,' which garners him visibility. Loucks offers to have the address re-written in a more substantial form to gather more support from the people. He also inquires the help of Pettigrew in the capacity of reviewing Loucks present manuscript for a book which is slated to be published.

Correspondence

H.L. Loucks writes to R.F. Pettigrew concerning Pettigrew's upcoming political venture on a platform with Mr. Landis, which Loucks hopes will throw people for a loop. Loucks expresses his apprehension about Mrs. Burgess and her political aptitude.

Correspondence

Loucks speaks to R.F. Pettigrew about the progress of linotyping the manuscript as well as his desire to simply funnel all his time into the current writing process. Loucks also mentions that with his manuscript, he has not been reading much of the magazines but notices that the farmers have and he wishes to perhaps secure a post writing for such a magazine to benefit their organization

Correspondence

R.F. Pettigrew writes to H.L. Loucks concerning the current state of the nation and state politically. Pettigrew discusses his dislike for President Wilson and the current administration. Pettigrew also mentions the money expenditure used to pay for tax pamphlets and being printed in newspapers. Finally, Pettigrew begins partnership with Loucks for the coming months.

Correspondence

R.F. Pettigrew writes to H.L. Loucks regarding to the Pettigrew's lack of funds to invest into the newspapers currently. Pettigrew also mentions that he is traveling to Washington State to visit his boys and will be unable to respond to Loucks completely.

Correspondence

R.F. Pettigrew discusses with H.L. Loucks his disagreement with Richard O. Richards and his most recent proposition of an income tax. Pettigrew mentions that he would join Richard O. Richards if he organized an independent movement that was not reliant on any of the current political parties. Pettigrew expresses his aspiration to build up either a progressive or people's party that supported the workers.

Correspondence

R.F. Pettigrew writes to H.L. Loucks concerning Pettigrew's desire to take leadership on a present matter as to which he has none. Pettigrew also mentions that his finances keep him from supporting Loucks in the manner in which he would prefer.

Correspondence

R.F. Pettigrew speaks with H.L. Loucks about the Loucks' current article and the arguments therein. Pettigrew mentions that Loucks should follow a particular strain of his own argument that would greatly benefit his article. Pettigrew also voices his dislike for the bankers and financiers of New York. Pettigrew briefly covers his thoughts in regards to 'intrinsic' and 'extrinsic value.'

Correspondence

R.F. Pettigrew writes H.L. Loucks stating his intent to read Loucks' manuscript. Pettigrew also states to Loucks that Pearson's Magazine would be a beneficial place to submit his articles. Pettigrew mentions that now would be an opportune time to begin working towards a constitutional convention in South Dakota with hopes of amending the current constitution.

Correspondence

R.F. Pettigrew writes H.L. Loucks concerning Loucks' manuscripts and articles, pointing out the pros and cons of both. Pettigrew mentions his decision to vote for the Socialists as well as the idea of building up a Socialist party. Pettigrew also states that he does not wish to help Loucks start a new party but will always be available to discuss questions of further importance.

Correspondence

H. L. Loucks writes to R.F. Pettigrew about the elections of 1914. Loucks speculates that he had lost the election for senator from South Dakota and thanks Pettigrew for his assistance. Loucks also makes comments about the national election results.

Correspondence

H.L. Loucks thanks R.F Pettigrew for the package of leaflets sent to him and sadly cannot use them and he plans to send them back to Pettigrew. Loucks also talks in length of the new party which they are going to start and the system by which it should be adopted.

Correspondence

H.L. Loucks writes to R.F. Pettigrew about the status current politics in terms of calling a national convention. Loucks also mentions a Mrs. A. Burgess, the daughter of a Mr. Crane, who is interested in reviewing the manuscript which Loucks continues to write.

Correspondence

Loucks continues to speak to R.F. Pettigrew regarding the necessity of calling a state conference with emphasis placed on finding new representatives. Loucks comments on the support and help of Alli Reed in terms of the manuscript and the framework of their organization. Loucks also mentions that his book in moving along, albeit, at a slower pace than he would prefer.

Correspondence

R.F. Pettigrew discusses with H.L. Loucks the desire to get at least one newspaper in Sioux Falls for their needs as well having a stock of Pearson's Magazines featuring Charles Edward Russell's article on Grain Trust ready to be distributed. Pettigrew argues the necessity of changing the current society from 'egotistic to altruistic.'

Correspondence

R.F. Pettigrew writes to H.L. Loucks concerning the Richards Law and current referendum in the State legislature. Pettigrew believes that Richards must go alone while still arguing for Primary Law. Pettigrew also mentions the continued desire to buy a newspaper though expresses his inability to do so with current funds.

Correspondence

R.F. Pettigrew responds to H.L. Loucks affirmation regarding Loucks money question. Pettigrew laments of his inability to financially help Loucks in his education endeavors and hopes that his financial condition will soon recover. Pettigrew also speaks boldly of his dislike for money and how it influences the people of Sioux Falls.

Correspondence

R.F. Pettigrew congratulates H.L. Loucks on his call to action in reference to a conference, one in which Pettigrew is most happy to attend. Pettigrew continues in speaking boldly of his dislike for the party system and their operations of disrepute.

Correspondence

R.F. Pettigrew articulates to H.L. Loucks his distaste for the book that Loucks recommended to him. Pettigrew also mentions that he would prefer to remain distanced from any conference with the author of the book. Pettigrew expresses great admiration and interest in Loucks' manuscript and desire to read it further.

Correspondence

H. L. Loucks writes to R.F. Pettigrew about his hopes for the national Progressive Party. He suggests that Pettigrew, Richard O. Richards and he start a newspaper to advance their political agenda. He mentions that the Saturday News in Watertown, South Dakota is for sale.

Correspondence

H. L. Loucks writes about the troubled state of politics in South Dakota. He mentions that he would be a part of the Republican Party if they would nominate progressive candidates. Loucks discusses the recent movement for farmers to organize. He mentions that Richard O. Richards has decided to remain in the Republican Party. Loucks believes that not all ballots cast for him were counted in the 1914 election.

Correspondence

H. L. Loucks writes about assisting Richard O. Richards in bringing up a suit to repeal Richards' primary law amendment. He also mentions that Richards does not want to start a newspaper. Loucks is still interested in finding a medium to publish his agenda and discusses the reliability of the press in South Dakota.

Correspondence

H. L. Loucks writes to R.F. Pettigrew about the leaflets he is publishing to promote progressive ideals. He thinks he will use the Rural Credit issue to bring attention to financial issues of farmers. Loucks mentions the upcoming 1916 elections and the likelihood of independent candidates.

Correspondence

H.L. Loucks expresses his doubt about joining Richard O. Richards in an independent political alliance. Loucks talks about not taking part in the state primary elections and that although he will not lead in the creation of an independent party, he will be willing to help the movement. Loucks asks Pettigrew to reread his address to the Christian Endeavor Society. He discusses his view regarding the money question and the preparedness issue.

Correspondence

H. L. Loucks writes to R. F. Pettigrew about a court case as to which Loucks is the primary counsel. Loucks mentions that he will use the argument going against the idea of 'rural credit.'; Loucks insists on Pettigrew visit Gifford and Amos Pinchot, whom Loucks deems capable of becoming national leaders.

Correspondence

H.L. Loucks responds to the R.F. Pettigrew and expresses sorrow for the current condition of Mrs. Pettigrew. Loucks also returns to his manuscript in speaking about how he wishes to take his time to write his statements and that Pettigrew may read and revise at his leisure, as there is no imminent reason that Loucks manuscript must be ready.

Correspondence

H.L. Loucks talks of his manuscript to R.F. Pettigrew, which has become something of a burden for him. Loucks also continues to talk of starting a new party, which will give them both leverage in the political realm. For now, Loucks determines that they ought to remain quiet and simply wait.

Correspondence

Loucks writes to R.F. Pettigrew concerning the cost of having part of the pamphlet printed as well as the pieces of the manuscript in friendly newspapers. Loucks hopes to copyright certain features of the pamphlet and manuscript to provide solid arguments. Mrs. Burgess urges Loucks to arrange a national call, which Loucks wishes to avoid at the present time.

Correspondence

Loucks talks to R.F. Pettigrew about the current state of their group which has not yet 'practical' levels in South Dakota. State Auditor J.E. Handlin is mentioned by Loucks for his earnest in taking a stand and Loucks wishes to stand by him. A Supreme Court plea is mentioned as well as various other people regarding politics and present status of South Dakota.

Correspondence

Loucks articulates to R.F. Pettigrew that an urgent call went out for a conference in Sioux Falls for their organization through the encouragement of Alli Reed. The call for a conference is not only to take place in Sioux Falls but also Chicago. Loucks also mentions that he believes the time is right for action for the Farmers Nonpartisan Political League.

Correspondence

R.F. Pettigrew talks with H.L. Loucks concerning the upcoming nomination for presidential candidate for the Republicans, as Pettigrew is hoping for a Progressive candidate as opposed to a reactionary one. Pettigrew also expresses his desire and agreement with Loucks concerning the procurement of numerous newspapers. Pettigrew also mentions various senators and party members, including Charles Edward Russell.

Correspondence

R.F. Pettigrew writes to H.L. Loucks concerning Loucks' address which shall be put into pamphlet form. Pettigrew mentions his great dislike for financiers of New York and the hope that Loucks' address will wake the people up from the spell of the financiers. Pettigrew also comments on the optimism that the people of the country will vote in a republican President.

Correspondence

R.F. Pettigrew expresses to H.L. Loucks the corruption and fraud of the current presidential administration. Pettigrew mentions his sadness and anger over those who would do nothing to change what has always been. Pettigrew reassures Loucks that his work will bear reward someday.

Correspondence

R.F. Pettigrew pens a letter to H.L. Loucks expressing his desire that Loucks would come visit him to discuss the matters at hand. Pettigrew also mentions that he is going to attempt to sell Loucks' article to Pearson's Magazine.

Correspondence

Letter from H. L. Loucks to R.F. Pettigrew about a the creation of the Progressive Party in South Dakota. The back of the letter is a copy of an article written by Loucks called 'The Grange and the Farmers' Problems,'; which discusses the European system of farmer cooperation and advocates its adaptation in the United States.

Correspondence

H. L. Loucks writes about his desire to be involved in politics at the national level. He mentions Richard O. Richards will continue his work with the primary law amendments and Loucks believes he will be an ally in the elections. He suggests that Pettigrew should contact progressive leaders throughout the United States.

Correspondence

H.L. Loucks asks R. F. Pettigrew to read a copy of an address he gave at a meeting in St. Paul. Loucks states that he will not take part in the primary elections and that he cannot be part of the Progressive Party with Roosevelt and Perkins leading it. He feels that the Socialist Party's views are too narrow for him to join them. Loucks suggests that there is a good prospect in South Dakota for the rise of an independent party.

Correspondence

H.L. Loucks speaks of his manuscript to R.F. Pettigrew, which he is saddened that he must cut down so as to sell the finished manuscript for a set price. Loucks also mentions that he and Pettigrew should begin to plan for a general conference after the national convention. A mention of Richard O. Richards is also made near the end of the letter speaking of the national convention.

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